Show is stuff of ‘Myths and Legends’

April 24 is final day of photo exhibit with 42 pictures on display

Sonya Ellingboe
sellingboe@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 4/20/21

Time is running out fast before the April 24 conclusion of “Myths and Legends,” the 2021 Eye of the Camera photography exhibit (by reservation) at the Littleton Museum, and we hope some will have …

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Show is stuff of ‘Myths and Legends’

April 24 is final day of photo exhibit with 42 pictures on display

Posted

Time is running out fast before the April 24 conclusion of “Myths and Legends,” the 2021 Eye of the Camera photography exhibit (by reservation) at the Littleton Museum, and we hope some will have already visited it. In the 55th year, the exhibit, presented by the Littleton Fine Arts Board, includes 42 works by 24 artists in both color and black and white. This year’s juror was John Barnabas Lake, from the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley.

Lake is the photo area coordinator at the UNC School of Art and Design and College of Visual and Performing Arts at UNC. The 2021 exhibit, smaller than usual, but strong, offers especially nice statements about each piece — allow a bit of extra time to read these. Many are strongly poetical!

Lake chose as Best of Show “Outside Woman,” a collaboration by conceptual artist Sherry Wiggins and photographer Luis Felipe Branco, that made me think of La Llorona, a woman of Latin American legend, who searches for her drowned children. Dressed in white, she wanders and cries for them ... This large black and white print has a ghostly woman in a gauzy white dress peering in the window of a mountain home. “Is this a ghost or a goddess?” the text asks. “There is a sense of mystery and of the mythical ...”

First Place went to Mattie Cox’s “Gondola Ride,” one in a series of colored vertical prints depicting an abandoned Kentucky theme park that had shut down in the 1990s. Cox wrote that her friends felt uncomfortable there — convinced it’s a “Wrinkle in Time” vortex or a portal to another dimension ...

As one enters the gallery to the right, Thomas Carr’s “Decay #2 and “Decay #3” also convey mystery from a long-ago era. Carr is an archaeologist, whose images of ancient stone walls reflect layers of “decay and rebirth all around ...”

Next, a visitor finds photographs made by well-known Denver painter Tony Ortega, depicting legends from his world: “Dia @ Santa Maria,” shows a happy parade with townspeople carrying a colorful, flower-laden statue of Mary through a town, and “Day of the Dead Danzante Muerta” with a figure with skull face ... in sepia with touches of red and yellow. One can almost hear music from behind these figures.

“A gentleman came from nowhere and stood at the cliff — in the right place at the right time,” says Danny Lam of his “Grand View,” which won an Honorable Mention.

Second Place went to Kathryn Charles, who grew up in Littleton. Her “Between Me and the Sea” depicts “the rough sea of the lower Hebrides” captured in 2020.

“Crow,” by Nicholas Kremsky, is labeled “altered photo.” The large portrait shot carries the note that “The crow is known as the messenger in myths. They also carry the souls of the dead ...”

Elizabeth Kayl’s “When Midnight Calls” relates, she wrote, “to the story of seven birds who sing at night. It harks back over centuries and over multiple cultures. The song of these night birds forecasts calamity ... in ancient France they are the spirits of souls in torment ...”

At the rear of the gallery, one finds Justin Key’s large horizontal images of Great Sand Dunes National Park — a magical place where he says “every step produces a new alignment.”

Myths and legends,

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