Election 2020: Scenes from Jefferson County

Glenn Wallace
gwallace@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 11/3/20

Across Jefferson County and beyond, it was nigh impossible to escape the signs, yard-based or otherwise, of Election 2020. Whether it in a multitude of signs dotting every neighborhood, to the many …

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Election 2020: Scenes from Jefferson County

Posted

Across Jefferson County and beyond, it was nigh impossible to escape the signs, yard-based or otherwise, of Election 2020.

Whether it in a multitude of signs dotting every neighborhood, to the many rallies that have dotted the streets of the county, this has been an active year for political activity.

Places like 80th and Wadsworth in Arvada have become ideological battlegrounds for months now, as every Saturday morning, like clockwork, Black Lives Matter and Democratic candidate supporters on one side of the street will rally, while Trump and GOP candidate supporters have rallied on the opposite side.

“It’s encouraging whether they love us or they hate us ... it’s all about love of country and the 1st Amendment,” House District 29 Republican candidate Vanessa DeMott said, waiving her campaign sign on the pro-Trump side of the street on Oct. 30.

Arvadan Frank Lopez said he and his wife first came out to the street corner alone, to support police in the midst of the summer’s Black Lives Matter protests against police brutality.

“We have a right to share our beliefs, not be locked down, not to be scared,” Lopez said, waving a giant Trump campaign flag.

Across the street, and across the political divide, was a different crowd of protesters waving Black Lives Matter, equality, and the occasional Biden/Harris sign.

Elizabeth Kantner of Arvada, holding a “Justice for Elijah and Breonna” sign said the opposing groups typically coexisted fine. She said her group had begun protesting police brutality more than 20 weeks ago. She added that no matter what the outcome of the election, problems of inequality and racism would not disappear.

“Just like Covid, just because you’re tired of something, doesn’t mean it’s gone,” Kantner said.

Colleen Smith, also of Arvada, was one of the very first protesters to start coming out on Saturdays. She said she was protesting against injustice, and for younger generations. She echoed Kantner’s point.

“Win or lose,” she said, “We’ll be out here next week too.”

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